Health

Beat bad breath by boosting your ginger intake

Nutritionist Alix Woods shares five health-boosting benefits of ginger 

New research has found that ginger stimulates an enzyme contained in saliva which can break down foul-smelling substances. But that’s not all that’s great about ginger. This ‘superfood’ is associated with a number of health benefits – from promoting fresh breath to better after-taste qualities and much more.

Here are five reasons to include more ginger in your diet: 

  1. Anti-nausea support – ginger has long been known to support various digestive symptoms, such as nausea, indigestion and bloating. Studies report that the root eases morning sickness in pregnancy and helps to relieve nausea in general.
  2. Pain relief – ginger has anti-inflammatory properties from ‘gingerols’, the active antioxidants which have been found to reduce arthritic, joint and muscular pain.
  3. Support weight loss – ginger has the ability to burn fat, triggering thermogensis which might be helpful if you’d like to shed a few pounds.
  4. Balance blood sugar – ginger helps regulate insulin and the breakdown of carbohydrates (glucose) and fats, which can help to maintain blood sugar and energy.
  5. Lower cholesterol – studies have shown that by taking 3g of ginger powder daily, LDL (low density lipoprotein) cholesterol and triglycerides were reduced.

Easy ways to consume more ginger 

One of the easiest ways to increase your ginger intake immediately is to take a supplement. Here are two which are relatively new to the market: sense_joint_bone_150-800x800

Sense for Joint & Bone 

As well as ginger, this formula contains numerous superfoods, such as rosehips and bananas, which are both said to help prevent joint damage and inflammation. It also contains turmericto help bone healing and formation and offer protection from joint and bone-related disorders.

Liquid Health Digestive Care

liquid healthThis unique combination of ginger, bladderwrack, aloe vera and marine collagen (alongside other powerful ingredients) has been designed to help support the body’s defence and immune systems – and could prevent you from catching that winter cold! Liquid supplements are highly concentrated and often contain more ingredients than if you were to take lots of different pills. The liquid form is easier and quicker to absorb too.

 

 

 

Health

The link between bad breath, diabetes and how Ayurvedic medicine can help

Dr Sarah Brewer has teamed up with type 2 diabetes supplement CuraLin to talk about the side effects of having undiagnosed diabetes and how you can control your blood sugar levels with Ayurvedic herbs

Did you know that your breath could be an indicator of your glucose levels and that poor teeth and gum health could be a sign of type 2 diabetes?

Don’t ignore bad breath! 

This complication of type 2 diabetes is known as ketoacidosis and causes an acetone-like smell on the breath. If you detect this, make sure you get medical advice because your glucose levels could be dangerously high.

Raised blood sugar levels promote bacteria growth, which can lead to gingivitis (inflamed and infected gums) which, if not addressed, can spread to cause periodontitis. The latter causes an unpleasant odour and can erode away bone and even cause teeth to fall out.

If you have type 2 diabetes and develop bad breath, this could be a sign of poor glucose control. Improving glucose levels through diet, lifestyle and a herbal Ayurvedic medicine, such as CuraLin, or (if indicated) prescribed medication, can help. Dental treatment and hygiene are key too. Regular dental check-ups are important –especially when you have diabetes.  curalin_bottle

CuraLin is a natural blend of 10 Ayurvedic herbs, which have a long history of use in Ayurvedic medicine to help balance glucose levels are suitable for people who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes or impaired glucose intolerance and is not taking any medication. The blend is also suitable for anyone who is managing type 2 diabetes with diet and lifestyle changes alone.

The herbs used to achieve this balance are Bitter Melon, Fenugreek, Amla, Swertia Chirata, Gymnema Sylvestre, Turmeric, Syzygium Cumini, Picrorhiza Kurroa, Tinospora Cordifolia, and Melia Azadirachta.

For more about Ayurvedic medicine, pick up a copy of the October/November Holistic Scotland Magazine.

 

Health

10 facts you didn’t know about kissing

Today (Friday, 22 June) is National Kissing Day! To help mark the occasion, Dr Harold Katz of The Breath Company shares 10 little-known facts about kissing, along with his top hygiene tips.

DID YOU KNOW?

1. The mouth is full of bacteria and when two people kiss, they exchange between 10 million and 1 billion bacteria, so remember to brush, rinse and floss!

2. Kissing is actually good for your teeth. The anticipation of a kiss increases the flow of saliva to your mouth and gives your teeth a plaque-dispersing bath.

3. Bad breath can’t be passed on to another person via kissing.

4. A French kiss involves all 34 muscles in the face, whereas a quick pucker involves only two.

5. Passionate French kissing can burn up to five calories in a few seconds or about 150 calories (calculation compiled by Dr Harold Katz) in a minute.  Kiss for 10 minutes… and skip the gym!

6. Kissing makes you feel happy, positive and less stressed because it releases endorphins and oxytocin. According to relationship therapist Dr. Krista A. Bloom, our lips are super- sensitive and have approximately 10,000 nerve endings – and that’s why we love kissing so much.

7. So far, the movie with the most kisses, namely 127, is Don Juan (1926).  Andy Warhol’s Kiss (1963) contains the longest kiss ever filmed.  Splendor in the Grass (1963) with Natalie Wood and Warren Beatty made history with Hollywood’s first on-screen French kiss.

8. People in the 18 to 24 age group are making out an average of 11 times each week.

9. 5% of people aged 45 and over are managing more than 31 passionate kisses each week.

10. Kissing is healthy and can even make you live longer. Even a quick goodbye kiss before leaving home can have huge benefits.

Boots and Superdrug are helping the nation prepare to kiss with confidence this National Kissing Day with savings off breath freshening treatments from The Breath Company, whose products include Fresh Breath Toothpaste, Fresh Breath Chewing Gum, and Fresh Breath Oral Rinse – all of which are made from pure, natural ingredients.

Health

Is stress causing your bad breath?

It’s estimated that 50% of the UK population suffers from bad breath but is stress the culprit?
Yes, says dentist, bacteriologist and founder of The Californian Breath Clinics and The Breath Company Dr Harold Katz.
“It’s well documented that stress can have a huge impact on our general health and can cause a plethora of physical conditions, such as heart disease and obesity, as well as serious mental health disorders such as anxiety and depression,” says Dr Katz.
“Specifically, when taking our oral health in to account, stress can really take its toll and be attributed to various oral health issues including bad breath, gum disease
and mouth ulcers to name a few.”
But how does stress cause halitosis?
“When individuals find themselves in high stress circumstances, their bodies react by using the sympathetic nervous system as a form of protection.
“This system essentially triggers the fight-or-flight response mechanism, providing you with a boost of energy so you can react quickly to the situation. In cases of chronic stress, your body is kept in ‘fight or flight’ mode and conserves energy by turning off certain digestive functions such as the production of saliva.
“The mouth then produces a lower level of saliva – saliva is mandatory for moistening food for easier digestion, but the body deems it unnecessary in critical situations.
“Saliva evaporates and the mouth becomes dry, leading to bad breath. This happens because the odorous gases created by bacteria in the mouth, which are generally suppressed by spit and swallowed away, are free to be released into the air.
“Additionally, bacteria are much more likely to stick to the surfaces of a dry mouth, which can further enhance the sour smell. Drinking plenty of water, chewing sugar-free gum and rinsing with a non-alcohol mouthwash can help to minimise the effects of stress related halitosis.”
How can stress cause gum disease?
“A small amount of blood in the sink when you clean your teeth might not seem like a big deal, but consistently bleeding gums should not be ignored. Bleeding gums are a visual symptom of gum disease which can be caused by stress. There are a few factors that link stress to bleeding gums and the onset of gum disease.
“Firstly, when the body is under stress it produces elevated amounts of the hormone
cortisol which acts as an anti-inflammatory agent. When cortisol is produced peripherally in the gums, it stimulates mast cells to produce more proteins, simultaneously increasing inflammation and the progression of gum disease.
“In addition, individuals with high stress levels tend to adopt bad oral hygiene and lifestyle habits, and this in turn can have a negative impact on their oral health.
“If gum disease isn’t in advanced stages then good oral hygiene habits can reverse it so it’s essential to adopt a robust oral hygiene regimen coupled with regular trips to your dentist who can offer sound advice on correct brushing and flossing techniques.”
How can stress cause mouth ulcers?
“Chronic stress suppresses the immune system and can leave you open to disease and infection. Mouth ulcers are one example of this and although are relatively harmless can make life unbearable when eating, drinking, speaking or swallowing.
“They occur on the inside of the mouth and are white or yellow surrounded by a dark red area. Minimising your exposure to stressful situations and adopting some simple lifestyle changes can reduce your chances of developing moth ulcers.”
How can I minimise stress and its effects on my oral health?
“Stress can often be an unavoidable part of modern day living, but that can really hinder your day-to-day life. You can help to minimise the impact that stress has on your oral health by adopting the following:
Start with some lifestyle changes. Stress can often lead us to make bad lifestyle choices that will impact our oral health. Limiting consumption of sugary foods and drinks, alcohol and quitting smoking will all contribute to healthier gums and mouth. Smoking in particular dries out the mouth and can lead to gum disease as a result of bacteria and toxins causing plaque to form in the mouth.
Exercise. Fitting exercise into your lifestyle will do wonders for your stress level. When you exercise, you’re using physical activity to shed the mind of stressful thoughts. Regularly practicing yoga for example, may be great for the body and mind. Similarly, deep breathing exercises can be very beneficial, and any form of exercise may boost endorphin production and help you better handle your emotions in high-tension situations.
Adopt a robust oral health regimen. Brush and floss regularly but avoid harsh soap in
toothpaste. Brushing helps eradicate the plaque and bacteria on your teeth, however some toothpaste contain sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), a soapy detergent that creates foam but has no cleaning benefit. The additive has recently been linked to serious side effects including canker sores.
Flossing is an extra step, but it’s an important one, as it helps gets in between the teeth where toothbrushes sometimes miss. In addition, regular and specific application of alcohol-free mouth rinses such as The Breath Company Healthy Gums Oral Rinse will help calm the gum area and work to both eliminate germs associated with gum disease and reduce the formation of biofilm which leads to plaque and tartar build-up.
It’s important to steer clear of alcohol-based mouthwashes as these can cause dry mouth, and just mask odours rather than killing off bacteria
Stay hydrated throughout the day. The fight-or-flight reaction to stress can make you
dehydrated and this leads to dry mouth and bad breath bacteria forming which can both
contribute to the onset of halitosis gum disease. If you keep your mouth and body well hydrated, you will minimise the chance of developing dry mouth that can lead to these problems.
• Talk to your dentist and make regular check-ups. They are the very best source of advice and will be able to check for any signs of any stress-related gum disease and bad breath issues. In addition, they will be able to offer advice on how to prevent stress affecting your oral health and put in place a care plan that is bespoke to you.”
Dr. Harold Katz is a dentist with an advanced degree in bacteriology and a lifelong advocate of good oral health. He is the founder of The California Breath Clinics and the developer of the The Breath Company line of premium oral care products. He is the internationally recognised expert in the fields of bad breath, taste disorders, tonsil stones and dry mouth.
Known as the ‘Bad Breath Guru’ due to his numerous television appearances on U.S shows like The View and the CBS Early Show, he has helped
millions of people around the world eliminate their bad breath problems.
Dr. Katz is a graduate of the UCLA School of Dentistry and holder of a separate degree in Bacteriology, also from UCLA. In the 1970s he established a thriving dental practice in Beverly Hills, California, minutes from bustling 20th Century Fox Studios. There, he perfected his dental techniques while working with some of Hollywood’s biggest stars.