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7 reasons to visit The Enchanted Forest this Autumn

The Enchanted Forest 2018 got off to a wild and wonderful start earlier this month with the launch of this year’s Of The Wild theme at Faskally Wood near Pitlochry.

Showcasing the autumnal beauty of Highland Perthshire, the sound and light spectacular released a record 80,000 tickets for its extended five-week run (Oct 6 – Nov 4).

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Inspired by the hidden beauty of Highland Perthshire’s wild woods, the multi-award-winning creative team has developed a show rooted in nature and full of surprises.

This year’s show combines breath-taking visuals, state-of-the-art technologies and a powerful musical score against a backdrop of one of Scotland’s most breathtaking woodland locations.

Here are 7 good reasons to visit:

  1. Spend time outdoors in nature & boost your wellbeing – The Enchanted Forest works closely with Forestry Commission Scotland to enhance the natural features of the forest and encourage more people to embrace Scotland’s woodlands.

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2. Experience the ultimate in forest bathing – The forest contains 25 recorded species of tree, a handful of which are native: Scots Pine, Silver and Downy Birch, Ash, Oak, Rowan, Common Alder, Hazel, and Bird Cherry. The oldest known tree is around 200-225 years old.

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3. Help sustain local charitiesOutdoor Access Trust for Scotland, The Birks Cinema Trust and Blairgowrie Riding for Disabled, which has been faced with closure, have been confirmed as the official charity partners for 2018. These organisations will not only benefit financially but will be promoted extensively during the event.

Enchanted Forest 2018

4. Support Scottish tourism – It’s estimated The Enchanted Forest’s impact on the local tourism economy is around £3 million a year.

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Toasting marshmallows

5. Support ecology and conservation – In 2017 The Enchanted Forest donated £500 to Tayside Bat Group (TBG) to install around 30 bat boxes in Faskally Wood. The forest already provides suitable habitat for a range of bat species but these boxes increase available roosting sites for them. TBG volunteers placed the new nesting boxes in a strip of trees along the edge of Loch Dunmore.

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Fluid – created by Squid Soup of squidsoup.org: Dynamically controlled floating points of light visualise the flow of energy, both real and imagined, as suggested by the water and surrounding landscape. Inspired by the myriad of cultural references to energy and flow patterns, from Aboriginal dreamtime paintings to Japanese wave and ripple designs, this uses light and technology to place a dynamic layer onto physical space that is both an augmentation and reflection of it.

6. Embrace Scottish culture & feel inspired – Now in its 17th year, The Enchanted Forest has won numerous awards, most recently being named finalist for Best Cultural Event at the Scottish Thistle Awards for the fifth year in a row. The event also took the coveted Best Cultural Event at the 2016 UK Events Awards in London last winter.

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Illumiphonium – created by Michael Davis of illumiphonium.co.uk: A dynamic and interactive multi-sensory, music-making instrument – the first of its kind. This semi-acoustic, semi-automatic, multi-player musical sculpture comprises more than 100 illuminated chime bars, each of which respond to touch, with ever-changing patterns of light and sound – spreading out like waves over the giant instrument’s surface, bringing people together into a fun and spontaneous music-making experience.

7. Dine out, carbon-free (well, almost) – On-site catering is by Lov Events UK, whose pop-up cafe bars offer a selection of wood-fired pizzas finished off with edible flowers, burgers and fries, mulled wine and more. All cutlery and crockery is Edenware from Go-Pak and fully compostable.

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Ian Sim, chairman of The Enchanted Forest Community Trust, which operates the event, said: “From humble beginnings as a three-night event with just 1500 visitors in 2002, it’s phenomenal to see how much The Enchanted Forest has grown during its 17 years. The love and support we have received is amazing and we are looking forward to welcoming a record 80,000 visitors this year.

“Our reputation as one of Scotland’s and the UK’s must-see autumn events is partly testament to the time we have spent over the years growing a community of dedicated partners, volunteers and followers, believing in what we are doing and listening and responding to feedback so that we can come back better each year. Despite growing significantly we are still a very intimate event and that’s what people seem to love the most. We don’t ever want to lose that.”

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Faskally Wood is home to a diverse range of wildlife. There are kingfishers and herons, and goldeneye ducks that nest in the trees. The 2018 Environmental Impact Study found that the wildlife in the forest shows no signs of being affected by the activities surrounding the event.

As the show goes from strength to strength, supporting the ecology in Faskally Wood is important to the continued success of The Enchanted Forest.

“We have always been keen to ensure that the event has minimal impact on the beautiful environment in which we operate, and the wildlife who call Faskally Wood their home,” says Ian.

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An independent Environmental Impact Study in 2018 confirmed that the Enchanted Forest team takes all possible measures to minimise impact on the forest environment and the wildlife in the forest.

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Fully compostable Edenware

And, when conservation work changed the landscape around Loch Dunmore, the creative team were quick to react to this new opportunity. They removed non-native rhododendron plants to encourage biodiversity and open up more of the loch – which inspired the name of the 2017 show: Oir An Uisge – ‘edge of the water’.

Rhododendron ponticum forms dense thickets and shades out native plants. If left uncontrolled, it will eventually dominate the habitat to the virtual exclusion of all other plant life.

Forestry Commission Scotland plan to replace to replace the rhododendron – which it classes as Scotland’s most invasive non-native plant – with more typical riparian vegetation, such as hazel, willow, alder and aspen.

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Photography: Angus Forbes /Lynda Hamilton Parker 

Did you know?

  • Faskally was purchased by the Forestry Commission in 1953. It covers 365 hectares and is divided in two by the old and new A9. The area where the Enchanted Forest takes place is approximately 66 hectares in size.
  • Faskally is derived from the Gaelic for “stance by the ferry” which probably relates to an old ferry crossing on the river Tummel.
  • The forest attracts approximately 70,000 visitors a year, excluding those to the Enchanted Forest.

Find out more, or book tickets, here 

 

News

Household brands renege on palm oil pledge

Eight major household brands including PZ Cussons, Johnson & Johnson and Kellogg’s  have refused to take steps towards eliminating palm oil from Indonesian forest destruction from their supply chains.

That’s according to Greenpeace which claims that, as members of the Consumer Goods Forum (CGF), these brands promised in 2010 to help protect forests and limit climate change by cleaning up global commodity supply chains by 2020. Yet with less than two years to go before the deadline, Greenpeace says it found some leading consumer brands unwilling to disclose even basic information needed to turn that pledge into reality.

At the start of 2018, Greenpeace International says it challenged 16 leading members of the CGF to demonstrate progress towards a clean palm oil supply chain by disclosing the mills that produced their palm oil, and the names of the producer groups that controlled those mills. It claims this would show whether brands had companies involved in forest destruction in their supply chains  – a vital first real step towards eliminating it.

Orangutan at BOS Nyaru Menteng Orangutan Rescue Center in Indonesia

The report,  which follows revelations that more than 100,000 orangutans have been lost in Indonesia in the last 16 years, reveals that, under pressure from Greenpeace and other NGOs (non-governmental organisations), eight brands made steps towards transparency. They are General Mills, Mars, Mondelēz, Nestlé, Procter & Gamble, Reckitt Benckiser, Unilever and ColgatePalmolive.

According to Greenpeace, the other half has so far failed. They include Ferrero, Hershey, Kellogg’s, Kraft Heinz, Johnson & Johnson, PepsiCo, PZ Cussons and Smucker’s.

Kiki Taufik, Global Head of Indonesian forests at Greenpeace Southeast Asia, said: “Brands have repeatedly promised to end deforestation for palm oil by 2020. With less than two years to go they are way off track.

“Some, such as Nestlé and Unilever, have at least come clean about that. Others, including PZ Cussons, Johnson & Johnson and Kraft Heinz, are still keeping customers in the dark.”

Transparency means it’s easier to see and hold to account traders that supply brands with palm oil sourced from rainforest destruction.

Greenpeace has also launched a campaign against Carex, demanding it comes clean about palm oil.

Daniela Montalto, Greenpeace UK Forests Campaigner said: It shouldn’t be up to NGOs to force the industry to keep their promises but progress is woefully slow. By hiding where their palm oil comes from, brands like Carex are making their customers unwittingly complicit in rainforest destruction.

“If Carex wants to save its reputation and stick by its slogan as a brand that ‘cleans, cares and protects’, it has to come clean about palm oil. Following through on its commitments to protect people, wildlife and the planet is the only way.”

Greenpeace says deforestation to produce commodities including palm oil shows no sign of slowing down. Ministry of Environment and Forestry (MoEF) figures state that around 24 million hectares of Indonesia’s rainforest was destroyed between 1990 and 2015 – an area almost the size of the UK.

The Indonesian Ministry of Forestry indicates 2.7 million hectares of deforestation between 2012 and 2015 – equating to one football pitch every 25 seconds.

It claims decades of deforestation for plantations have created the ideal conditions for the raging forest and peatland fires – often deliberately set by companies clearing the land – and exploitation of workers remains endemic in the sector.

In 2015, devastating forest fires spread a toxic haze across Southeast Asia, resulting in an estimated 100,000 premature deaths  and conservationists now speculate about when, not if, orangutans and other iconic species will become extinct.

News

Fifty per cent of all plant and animal species in the Amazon and Galapagos to become locally extinct by 2100

Fifty per cent of all plant and animal species in the world’s most naturally rich areas, such as the Amazon and Galapagos, could face local extinction by the turn of the century if carbon emissions aren’t brought into check.

That’s according to a new study carried out jointly between the University of East Anglia, James Cook University and WWF which claims that even if the Paris Climate Agreement 2°C target is met, these places could lose 25% of their species.

The research has been published today (Wednesday, 14 March) in the journal ‘Climatic Change’ – just ahead of WWF’s Earth Hour, the world’s largest environmental event.

Researchers examined the impact of climate change on nearly 80,000 plant and animal species in 35 of the world’s most diverse and naturally wildlife-rich areas – exploring a number of different climate change futures, from a no-emissions-cuts case in which global mean temperatures rise by 4.5°C, to a  2°C rise, the upper limit for temperature in the Paris Agreement.

They found that the Miombo Woodlands, which are home to African wild dogs; south-west Australia, and the Amazon-Guianas could be among the most affected areas.

The report suggests that if there was a 4.5°C global mean temperature rise, the climates in these areas could become unsuitable for many of the plants and animals currently liveing there. This means:  

• Up to 90% of amphibians, 86% of birds and 80% of mammals could potentially become locally extinct in the Miombo Woodlands, Southern Africa

• The Amazon could lose 69% of its plant species

• In south-west Australia 89% of amphibians could become locally extinct

• 60% of all species are at risk of localised extinction in Madagascar

• The Fynbos in the Western Cape Region of South Africa, which is experiencing a drought that has led to water shortages in Cape Town, could face localised extinctions of a third of its species, many of which are unique to that region. 

As well as this, increased average temperatures and more erratic rainfall could become be the “new normal” according to the report – with significantly less rainfall in the Mediterranean, Madagascar and the Cerrado-Pantanal in Argentina. Potential effects include:

• Pressure on the water supplies of African elephants – who need to drink 150-300 litres of water a day

• 96% of the breeding grounds of Sundarbans tigers could become submerged by sea-level rise

• Comparatively fewer male marine turtles due to temperature-induced sex assignment of eggs. 

If species can move freely to new locations then the risk of local extinction decreases from around 25% to 20% with a 2°C global mean temperature rise.  If species cannot they may not be able to survive. Most plants, amphibians and reptiles, such as orchids, frogs and lizards cannot move quickly enough to keep up with these climatic changes. 

Lead researcher Prof Rachel Warren of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research at UEA said: “Our research quantifies the benefits of limiting global warming to 2°C for species in 35 of the world’s most wildlife-rich areas.

“We studied 80,000 species of plants, mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians and found that 50% of species could be lost from these areas without climate policy. However, if global warming is limited to 2°C above pre-industrial levels, this could be reduced to 25%. Limiting warming to within 1.5°C was not explored, but would be expected to protect even more wildlife.” 

Overall the research is said to show the best way to protect against species loss is to keep global temperature rise as low as possible.

The Paris Agreement pledges to reduce the expected level of global warming from 4.5°C to around 3°C, which reduces the impacts, but WWF says we see even greater improvements at 2°C; and it is likely that limiting temperature rise to 1.5°C would protect more wildlife.

That’s why, on Saturday, 24 March at 8.30pm, millions of people across the world will come together for Earth Hour and show their commitment to reducing global emissions, as well as protecting people and wildlife from the impacts of climate change.

WWF says the event also sends a clear message to business and government that there is a global will to change this trajectory.

Dr Sam Gardner, Acting Director of WWF Scotland, said: “Within our children’s lifetime, places like the Amazon and Galapagos Islands could become unrecognisable, with half the species that live there wiped out by human-caused climate change.

“Around the world, beautiful iconic animals like Amur tigers (pictured) or Javan rhinos are at risk of disappearing, as well as tens of thousands of plants and smaller creatures that are the foundation of all life on earth.

“That is why this Earth Hour we are asking everyone to make a promise for the planet and make the everyday changes needed to protect our planet.

“Scotland has an important role to play in helping restore our fragile environment and wildlife, that’s why we’re calling on the Scottish Government to ensure that the forthcoming Climate Change Bill ends our contribution to climate change in a generation.

“This commitment will match that of other nations in the vanguard of climate leadership and help to build the momentum we need if we are to prevent the worst impact of climate change on our most precious species.”